Common sense and stereotyping in social work

Acknowledgements Foreword Since the introduction of the Age Discrimination Act Cthexperiences of age discrimination in employment among mature age workers have featured prominently in the complaints of age discrimination received by the Australian Human Rights Commission. InI undertook a series of consultations with peak bodies including age-based community groups, legal service providers, business groups, unions, academics and relevant government departments.

Common sense and stereotyping in social work

The questions of the definition of "person with a disability" and how persons with disabilities perceive themselves are knotty and complex. It is no accident that these questions are emerging at the same time that the status of persons with disabilities in society is changing dramatically.

The Americans with Disabilities Act ADA is the cause of some of these changes, as well as the result of the corresponding shift in public policy. Questions of status and identity are at the heart of disability policy. A moral model of disability which regards disability as the result of sin; A medical model of disability which regards disability as a defect or sickness which must be cured through medical intervention; A rehabilitation model, an offshoot of the medical model, which regards the disability as a deficiency that must be fixed by a rehabilitation professional or other helping professional; and The disability model, under which "the problem is defined as a dominating attitude by professionals and others, inadequate support services when compared with society generally, as well as attitudinal, architectural, sensory, cognitive, and economic barriers, and the strong tendency for people to generalize about all persons with disabilities overlooking the large variations within the disability community.

However, there are many cultures that associate disability with sin and shame, and disability is often associated with feelings of guilt, even if such feelings are not overtly based in religious doctrine.

Common sense and stereotyping in social work

For the individual with a disability, this model is particularly burdensome. This model has been associated with shame on the entire family with a member with a disability. Families have hidden away the disabled family member, keeping them out of school and excluded from any chance at having a meaningful role in society.

Even in less extreme circumstances, this model has resulted in general social ostracism and self-hatred.

Since many disabilities have medical origins, people with disabilities were expected to benefit from coming under the direction of the medical profession. Under this model, the problems that are associated with disability are deemed to reside within the individual.

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In other words, if the individual is "cured" then these problems will not exist. Society has no underlying responsibility to make a "place" for persons with disabilities, since they live in an outsider role waiting to be cured.

The individual with a disability is in the sick role under the medical model. When people are sick, they are excused from the normal obligations of society: They are also expected to come under the authority of the medical profession in order to get better.

Thus, until recently, most disability policy issues have been regarded as health issues, and physicians have been regarded as the primary authorities in this policy area. One can see the influence of the medical model in disability public policy today, most notably in the Social Security system, in which disability is defined as the inability to work.

This is consistent with the role of the person with a disability as sick. Historically, it gained acceptance after World War II when many disabled veterans needed to be re-introduced into society.

The current Vocational Rehabilitation system is designed according to this model. Persons with disabilities have been very critical of both the medical model and the rehabilitation model. While medical intervention can be required by the individual at times, it is naive and simplistic to regard the medical system as the appropriate locus for disability related policy matters.

Many disabilities and chronic medical conditions will never be cured. Persons with disabilities are quite capable of participating in society, and the practices of confinement and institutionalization that accompany the sick role are simply not acceptable.

This model regards disability as a normal aspect of life, not as a deviance and rejects the notion that persons with disabilities are in some inherent way "defective". As Professor David Pfeiffer has put it, " What, it is asked, is the normal way to be mobile over a distance of a mile?

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What is the normal way to earn a living? Most people will experience some form of disability, either permanent or temporary, over the course of their lives.

Given this reality, if disability were more commonly recognized and expected in the way that we design our environments or our systems, it would not seem so abnormal. The disability model recognizes social discrimination as the most significant problem experienced by persons with disabilities and as the cause of many of the problems that are regarded as intrinsic to the disability under the other models.

The cultural habit of regarding the condition of the person, not the built environment or the social organization of activities, as the source of the problem, runs deep. For example, it took me several years of struggling with the heavy door to my building, sometimes having to wait until a person stronger came along, to realize that the door was an accessibility problem, not only for me, but for others as well.Prejudice is often broken down when people have to work together with particular individuals to achieve a common goal.

Everyone has good and bad points, strengths and weaknesses. Prejudice means we only see the bad and weak points.

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There are many ways in which sociology and common sense differ, starting with the basic fact that sociology is a formal field of academic study, whereas common sense refers to people's innate ability to understand and assess the things they see and hear on a regular basis.

In social psychology, a stereotype is an over-generalized belief about a particular category of people. Stereotypes are generalized because one assumes that the stereotype is true for each individual person in the category.

While such generalizations may be useful when making quick decisions, they may be erroneous when applied to .

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Article examines two systems: families and communities, and how each contribute to the problem of incest/sexual abuse of children. Is Stereotyping Inevitable? - Prejudice, discrimination, and stereotyping are important topics at the cause of debating within social psychology. Attitudes, Attributions and Social Cognition above may reveal negative attitudes towards immigrants in their behaviour, their self-reports may appear more positive because they are reluctant to seem prejudiced.

Stereotype - Wikipedia