First draft writing advice

Which often leads to the most terrifying thing writers face: All first drafts have plot holes, places where character motivation goes missing, dull scenes, clunky transgressions and unearned epiphanies.

First draft writing advice

Which often leads to the most terrifying thing writers face: All first drafts have plot holes, places where character motivation goes missing, dull scenes, clunky transgressions and unearned epiphanies.

But sheesh, the thought of a potential F. Scott Fitzgerald scaling teeth is kind of sad. Anytime they can do less instead of more, they will, a minimalist philosophy they follow religiously. Plus, since staring at that blank page can be exceedingly stressful, the relief of letting it all pour out not only feels good, it feels right.

Well, you must not be a real writer after all. That is, a draft that begins to capture — in rudimentary, unpolished form — the story itself. So rather than flying blind, here are nine tips that can help you create that sort of shitty first draft, as opposed to a bunch of pages with words randomly romping across them.

Concentrate on what the language is meant to convey: I recently spoke with a writer who was celebrating having finished the first draft of his novel. He told me proudly that it came in at a little overwords, and that he loved every single one of them.

Know what your point is before you begin to write. All stories make a point, and everything in a story — in one way or another — builds toward it. Might your point change as you write?

first draft writing advice

But even knowing what your point might be allows you to focus in on a story that makes it, rather than romping aimlessly. A story making a point moves, a story that romps tends to run in place. Is it harder to write this way? Know the overarching problem your protagonist will face.

Know your ending first. How will you know what turns to take? How will you know what needs to happen next?Essential reading: the “Shitty First Drafts” chapter of Anne Lamott’s Bird By Bird: Almost all good writing begins with terrible first efforts.

You need to start somewhere. Start by getting something — anything — down on paper. A friend of mine says that the first draft is the down draft. 5 Ways to Wander—First Draft Writing Advice Feel safe while getting lost in your creative process. Posted May 22, Two Steps to Write a First Draft.

Perhaps you are the kind of person who likes to have a step-by-step list of things to follow. To help you, I have put together a list of steps for how to write a first draft. A fast draft means you have a starting place.

You get the main points down on paper. And even for longer projects, this process of writing a . Fruitless First Draft Struggles. By: Cris Freese Dan shares his thoughts on the first draft writing process, common first draft problems and why your story should always take precedent over these problems.

* * * * * First drafts. Very good advice. Thank you for them.

first draft writing advice

I myself recently started writing posts. Essential reading: the “Shitty First Drafts” chapter of Anne Lamott’s Bird By Bird: Almost all good writing begins with terrible first efforts. You need to start somewhere. Start by getting something — anything — down on paper.

A friend of mine says that the first draft is the down draft.

The Tyranny of the First Draft | The Talkative Writer