Informal fallacies in critical thinking

Informal fallacy Informal fallacies — arguments that are fallacious for reasons other than structural formal flaws and usually require examination of the argument's content.

Informal fallacies in critical thinking

Posted by Craig Brown e Thanks for continuing in this discussion of critical thinking and the most common informal fallacies. Recall that informal fallacies occur when we are making arguments using inductive reasoning where the conclusion does not necessarily follow from the premises because some new information is implied.

This is often the kind of argument we need to make in real life, both with others or even inside our own self. In the first post on this subject, I explained fallacies of presumption where the facts are misused.

Here I will discuss two other categories of informal fallacy: A Premise is Informal fallacies in critical thinking to the Conclusion Here I will illustrate four different ways we can come to irrelevant conclusions by basing our argument on unrelated statements or facts.

I love this cartoon for the simplicity! If reasoning against an argument seems too hard, then just attack the person! But you do it too! In this type of ad hominem an idea is considered reliable or sacred simply because of the source.

List of fallacies - Wikipedia

My Mother loves Oprah Winfrey and so do I. But to hear my Mother tell it, the woman can do no wrong. If they have lied in the past then they could be lying in the present. As with all the others, however, this is irrelevant.

We judge the present idea on its own merits. Example of a genetic ad hominem: Example of abusive ad hominem: Why would anyone listen to what this man has to say about gun control or global warming or anything else? He spent three years in federal prison for tax fraud.

Example of circumstantial ad hominem: Of course Senator Levin supports the auto bailout. Who is she to be against abortion? She had one herself when she was twenty. Example of Poisoning the Well: This woman lied about her employment history on her resume.

She lied about the number of children she had at the welfare office.

Into A Curious Mind

Why should we believe who she says was driving that night? If anyone has read my welcome pagethey would know that this kind of fallacy is particularly odious to me.

The reason this is a logical fallacy of course, is that even an expert can be wrong in a particular thing. The authority might be anyone from a single individual to some type of organization to simply cultural tradition.

I am continually appalled by the number of people who just go to their doctor and do whatever they are told.

Informal fallacies in critical thinking

Apparently they are unaware of the huge diversity of opinion that exists on almost any topic in the medical community. No one can advocate for yourself like you. Example of an Appeal to an Authority of One: For a millennium and a half, Aristotle was deemed to be the greatest authority for all natural knowledge.

But as great a philosopher as I personally agree that he was, he made one giant mistake that held back progress for centuries: This looks like a small error, but it was not.

It had a large effect on the history of scientific and technological progress. So many intuitive ideas we may have about the world are shown to be wrong for example, for something to keep moving we need to keep pushing it, correct?

Example of an Appeal to a Group Authority:Unlike formal fallacies which are identified through examining the structure of the argument, informal fallacies are identified through analysis of the content of the premises. In this group of fallacies, the premises fail to provide adequate reasons for believing the truth of the conclusion.

There are numerous different types of informal fallacies. Jan 17,  · This is the end of my discussion of presumptive informal fallacies where the facts are misused, and this is a reasonable place to end this post before it get’s too long.

My next post on critical thinking will discuss fallacies of relevance where at least one of the premises are unrelated to the conclusion, and fallacies of ambiguity where the. Feb 14,  · Thanks for continuing in this discussion of critical thinking and the most common informal fallacies.

Recall that informal fallacies occur when we are making arguments using inductive reasoning where the conclusion does not necessarily follow from the . any variety of fallacies of inductive reasoning having to do with estimating or beating the odds, often based on the use of past outcomes to predict the future outcomes of chance events invincible ignorance.

A fallacy in critical thinking is a failure of the the premisses of an argument to adequately support its conclusion. Fallacies can be formal or informal. Critical Thinking & Reasoning: Informal Fallacies. Unlike formal fallacies which are identified through examining the structure of the argument, informal fallacies are identified through analysis of the content of the premises.

In this group of fallacies, the premises fail to .

Fallacies: Formal and Informal Fallacies (video) | Khan Academy