The big band swing era

Webb Cuts Basie At The Savoy Another of the many jazz magazine articles on the site detailing the history of jazz music. This piece recounts the Count Basie vs. On this page of our journey into the history of jazz music we focus on pre Big Band era jazz music history as recorded before

The big band swing era

Music historians have a difficult time fixing the origins of musical styles with any precision. Many American musicians, no matter what their backgrounds, have had "big ears"--they have tended to listen to many forms of music and adapted them freely.

One form of American music, emerging in the years just before World War One, became known as "dixieland. Typically, it involved group improvisation and a loose, freewheeling, "swinging" style.

The Original Dixieland Jazz Band, and all-white group, gave the music its name in the popular markets.

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Louis Armstrong and Bix Biederbecke became most famous playing in this mode of dixieland jazz. By the late twenties, musicians had begun modifying the forms of "jazz.

Swing bands typically used an upright or double bass instead of the tuba which had often characterized dixieland, and played repeated "riffs" to give the music its propulsive rhythmic force. Swing appears to have emerged from an adaptation of the commercially successful but bland, neo-jazz played by show and dance orchestras like Paul Whiteman's.

In the hands of brilliant arrangers like Fletcher Henderson, however, swing combined harmonic sophistication with danceable rhythms and compelling individual improvisations. Swing bands ranged from "Kansas City" style groups like Count Basie's, which emphasized a very bluesy, intensely riff oriented style, to New York based bands like Duke Ellington's or Glenn Miller's which experimented with a more orchestral range of colors.

For many students of American music, "big band" swing represents a pinnacle of American musical form, combining harmonic sophistication, improvisational brilliance, and danceable accessibility.

Others have criticized swing as overly commercial, regimented, and mechanical. Whatever its aesthetic merits, swing music characterized the popular culture of the s. The music played constantly on records and on radio, and reached virtually every city in America through swing bands' incessant touring.

Historians have seen in "the swing era" not just music but culture, a distinctive, generational culture of swing jazz with its own dances, clothing styles, and most notably, slang. By the s there were several "dictionaries of jive" available to explain the special language of swing. Much of this slang grew from drug subculture; much of it seems to have had little to do with musicians, who often disliked it.

But it made its way across the nation. Hepcat, then take the "hipster's quiz" included here to test your knowledge of one of the swing era's most distinctive expressions. Take the Hepcat quiz!

Find album reviews, stream songs, credits and award information for The Big Band Era: 18 Greatest Hits - Various Artists on AllMusic - /5. For many students of American music, "big band" swing represents a pinnacle of American musical form, combining harmonic sophistication, improvisational brilliance, and danceable accessibility. Others have criticized swing as overly commercial, regimented, and mechanical. A big band is a type of musical ensemble that usually consists of ten or more musicians with four sections: saxophones, trumpets, trombones, and a rhythm section. Big bands originated during the early s and dominated jazz in the early s when swing was most popular.

Jitterbugging apparently originated in Harlem as a variation on the "lindy hop. Jitterbuggers, with their "breakouts" and "aerial moves" became as much a part of the show as the bands themselves. As rock and roll did in the fifties, swing culture seemed to offer a youthful alternative to the stultifying conventions and restrictions of middle class life.

By the eve of World War Two, swing culture had culminated as well in the "zoot suit," an exaggerated, parodic form of dress favored by Mexican and African American youth.

Like much of American popular culture, swing crossed ethnic and racial lines freely. White, black and Latin musicians borrowed from each other constantly. But what did this sort of interchange mean?

Between the Wars: The Swing Era

Benny Goodman, for example, a child of Jewish immigrants, became known as "the King of Swing. But Goodman earned the respect of white and black musicians alike when he integrated his band in Though this seems unexceptional today, in the s it was not only innovative but politically explosive.

To make his film Jammin the Blues, the photographer Gjon Mili had to get special permission from the studio to include white guitarist Barney Kessel in his band. The studio first attempted to stain Kessel's arms, hands, and face with "berry juice," so he would look darker, then finally relented after Mili agreed to film Kessel only in shadows.Early hot jazz bands, the hotel dance bands and the history of jazz music leading up to the Big Band era.

Big band - Wikipedia

History Of Jazz Part II The role of economics, early recording technology, and radio relative to the history of jazz and the Big Band era. The Big Band Era – The Swing Era The Big Band era is generally regarded as having occurred between and It was the only time in American musical history that the popularity of jazz eclipsed all other forms of music.

The Swing Era was jazz's most popular period Hundreds of bands Over entries in magazine polls of Billboard, Down Beat, Variety, Preview, Esquire, Metronome, Orchestra World, etc.

The swing era is known as the days of jazz when dance halls were packed with people eager to listen and swing dance to the best big bands from around the country. During this period, artists developed styles that influenced later musicians and subsets of jazz, from bebop and beyond.

2 were singers in a Big Band.

The big band swing era

2 were Big Bands. 2 were Sister Acts. And 2 were stars on the Swing Dance Floors.

Style Sheets

These are just some of the women of the Big Band Era that I wanted to highlight for today’s post.. Note: I’m focusing most of my post on the “not always mentioned” women.

The big band swing era

For many students of American music, "big band" swing represents a pinnacle of American musical form, combining harmonic sophistication, improvisational brilliance, and danceable accessibility.

Others have criticized swing as overly commercial, regimented, and mechanical.

The Big Band Era, Or How America Came Out Of The Great Depression And Went On To Win World War II